Doors of the World

Prague Siroka 96
Prague, Czech Republic
Dragon Door at Krumlov House, Czechia
Brewery street in Prague
Art Nouveau – Maison ‘aux Grenouilles – Bielsko Biała – Pologne
Pena Palace, Sintra, Portugal
Portal of the Monastery of Batalha, Batalha, Leiria, Portugal
Jeronimos monastery Lisbon – Portugal
Gdansk , Poland
Poland
Poland.
Art Nouveau Door – Krakow, Poland
Gdansk, Poland
Bucharest, Romania
Bucharest, Romania
Latvia~Riga.
Art Deco Door – Ystad, Sweden
Helsinki , Finland
Copenhagen, Denmark. It’s more than a piece of wood-jaw drops.
Viking Door, Stockholm, Sweden
Dresden, Saxony, Germany
Art Nouveau door-Berlin
Hamburg , Germany
Art Nouveau in Brussels
Den Haag, Holland
Canterbury. England  built in 1647
Wirksworth, England
Dublin, Ireland
Louvre door, Paris
Paris at 29 Avenue a few steps from the Eiffel Tower
ANGELS GUARD THEE. Père Lachaise Cemetery, Paris, France.
Venice, Italy
Naples, Italy
Pistoia, Italy
La Spezia, Liguria, Italy
La Spezia, Liguria, Italy
Barcelona ,  Roger de Llúria 010
Barcelona – Tapioles 012
Art nouveau door, casa Reus, Spain
Milan, Italy
Blue Door, Venice, Italy
Crete, Greece
Istanbul
Beyazıt, Istanbul
Art Nouveau door in Istanbul, Turkey
Turkey
Balat, Istanbul
Green Door Istanbul
Kabardinka, Russia
Kremlin of Ryaza, Russian
Dacha carved doors, Russia
Door in Russia
Staraya Ladoga, Russia
Doors in Rostov, Russia
Khiva, Uzbekistan
Tatarstan, Russia
China.
Shanghai, China
China
China Wrought Iron, Iron Door …
Jaisalmer, Rajasthan, India
Blue door in Pushkar, Rajasthan, India
Monkey Temple’ (Swayambunath Stupa), Kathmandu, Nepal
Bali, the Asian Art Museum
Royal door, Bangkok,
Sing Buri, Thailand
Thailand
Putrajaya Malaysia
Persian entrance
Intricate Door, Jerusalem, Israel
In Israel there is a city of blue-doors and a history touching upon some of the greatest Jewish mystical schools.
Jaffa, İsrail
Cairo, Egypt
There are big doors and small doors. Wisdom is knowing which one to take, when. In Tunis, Tunisia
Dogon people of Mali
Dogon door, Mali
Africa , Dogon door, Mali
Taroudant, Morocco
Fez, Morocco
Yoruba people of northern Ekiti Region of Nigeria
Harbel, Liberia
Bell Tower Door Westminster School Atlanta GA
Main Door, Mission San Jose, San Antonio, Texas
Santa-Fe,-New-Mexico,-USA
San Miguel de Allende, Guanajuato, Mexico
Puebla, Mexico
Medellin Colombia.
Havana, Cuba

Based from the PowerPoint: https://slideplayer.com/slide/14399896/ by Superman Tedja

Oh mom, is school far?

The children of Gulu, in China, need to walk for 5 hours along the side of cliffs, on a trail that in some places does not exceed 50 centimetres in width, in order to reach their school.
Children from the village of Zhangguying in China, to go to school, climb wooden stairs without any protection.
Children and their relatives use an ice path to reach the Zanskar boarding school in the Indian Himalayas.
Male and female students cross a ruined suspension bridge in Lebrak, Indonesia
Children forced to go to school through a steel cable suspended more than 800 meters above the Rio Negro in Colombia
Riau’s children in Indonesia go to school by canoe.
A crossing over the molded roots of giant trees next to Mawsynram, the rainiest village in the world.
A girl going to school on the back of a buffalo in Myanmar (Burma).
A tuk-tuk, a 3-wheel vehicle, picks up and drives students in Beldanga, India.
A father and his daughter cross a broken bridge under the snow in Dujiangyan in China’s Sichuan province.
Young students traveling on the roof of a boat in Pangururan, Indonesia.
Young girls pass on a board perched on a 16th century wall in Sri Lanka.
A cart loaded with students in Delhi, India.
Young girls cross a river on a bamboo raft in the village of Cilangkap in Indonesia.
Children and adults using a path of more than 200 km through the mountains to reach the boarding school in Pili, China.
Students crossing a river holding a rope in Padang, on the island of Sumatra in Indonesia.
Children crossing a river over inner tubes in Rizal, Philippines.
We congratulate the work of the photographers for these magnificent photos and we are fascinated by the courage shown by these children who risk their lives to reach the banks of the School.
Were you not impressed with these young students prepared for everything so they can quench their thirst for learning?
Fantastic isn’t it?
But in Portugal parents often do not support that their children have to walk 100m on foot !!! …

Translation: LOPSI

Taken from the PowerPoint made by Fernando Pires, which can be found at:

https://pt.slideshare.net/ferpires/oh-me-a-escola-longe

The North Sentinel Island

The most hostile place in the World: Northern Sentinel Island

They settled in the region 60,000 years ago and receive visitors with violence.

It is hard to believe that there are people in the world who know nothing about television, have never seen a car or made-up clothing.

However, there are still tribes that are completely separate from global civilization and do not maintain any contact with the outside world.

Nearly 60,000 years old, North Sentinel Island is a part of the Andaman and Nicobar Islands, which lies in the Indian Ocean, between Myanmar and Indonesia.

There, it is the place where there is one of the most isolated tribes on the planet.

Sentinelians are so hostile to external contact that the island was considered the most difficult place in the world to visit.

Sentinels seem to be direct descendants of the first humans to emerge from Africa.

The number of inhabitants cannot yet be certified, but it is estimated that there are between 40 and 500 natives.

No matter the character of the visitor, when they arrive on the island’s shores, whether on purpose or by accident, islanders receive intruders almost always in the same way: with spears and arrows, in an attack position.

Gifts, such as food and clothing, are of no importance to them.

This hostility reached the point where the natives offered resistance to rescue missions after the tsunami in 2004.

Just as the disastrous tsunami hit the Indian Ocean, a group of rescuers offered help to Sentinels through an Indian navy helicopter.

They wanted to find and help the survivors, although the chances were slim.

They tried to drop packages of food to the ground, but were met with hostility from the natives, including a sentinel warrior who came out of the dense jungle and shot an arrow trying to hit the helicopter.

Not much is known about these tribal people: the language is strange and the habits are unknown.

Their dwellings are hidden in the dense, closed forest, so there is no clue as to how they live.

All that is known is that Sentinels are hunters and gatherers, as they do not cultivate anything, it seems.

They live on fruits, fish, tubers, wild pigs, lizards and honey.

India has sovereignty over the Northern Sentinel, but it is believed that the people of that island do not even know what India is.

After several unsuccessful attempts to reach friendly contact, the Indian government finally stepped aside and banned all visits to the island.

The Indian Navy imposed a 3-mile protection zone to keep tourists, explorers and others busy at a distance.

Accidental encounters still occur and none of them ends well.

There are several horror stories of how Sentinelians have treated ‘guests’: most people return from the island terrified and injured when they return.

In 1896, a fugitive from the British Andamans prisons, drifted at sea and ended up by accident on the island’s shores.

A few days later, a search party found the body on a beach, pierced by arrows and with a cut throat.

In 1974, a group went there to make a documentary and the film’s director was wounded by an arrow in the leg.

Contact attempts

Indian anthropologist T.N. Pandit made several government-sponsored trips to the Northern Sentinel in the late 1980s and early 1990s.

“Sometimes, they turn their backs on us and sit on their hips like they are going to defecate,” he said.

“This is a symbol of insult to them, as we were not welcome.” Surprisingly, there was only one case where an outsider did not face an aggressive reception.

On January 4, 1991, a group of 28 people, composed of men, women and children, approached Pandit and his entourage.

“It was unbelievable how they volunteered for our meeting,” he said.

“They must have decided that it was time to get in touch with other people, or they were studying us”.

In 1991, Indian anthropologist Madhumala Chattopadhyay managed to establish a brief contact after several incursions to the island, but the project was eventually suspended to protect the tribe.

After these attempts, the local population closed again and, since then, never allowed any approach of “outsiders”.

Unfortunately, the last contact with the inhabitants of the island, in 2006, was not as good as expected.

Two fishermen were killed while fishing illegally within the island’s protection strip.

Sentinelans are among the last communities that live without contact with globalization.

Perhaps it is better to leave them as they are, as bringing them into civilization can be extremely negative.

After all, they may not be immune to various diseases that exist today and it can be extremely complicated to adapt to the modern world.

Original post: https://ncultura.pt/o-lugar-mais-hostil-do-mundo-a-ilha-sentinela-do-norte/