THE NEW PLACES CLASSIFIED BY UNESCO AS WORLD HERITAGE

Recently, the Committee decided to open up to new categories such as cultural landscapes and routes, industrial heritage (for example, this year, Ivrea, the industrial city of the 20th century, in Italy), deserts, marine sites coastal and small island sites, so that the list is more diverse and more representative of World Heritage. The sites proposed for inscription must meet at least one of the ten selection criteria, such as, for example, representing a masterpiece of human creative genius, testifying to an exchange of influences during History, to bear exceptional testimony to a cultural tradition or to a living or extinct civilization, or else to represent natural phenomena of exceptional beauty and aesthetic importance or, of course, to be eminently representative examples of ecological and biological processes …
Italy is the country with the largest number (54), followed by China (53), Spain (47), France (44), Germany (44), and finally, Mexico (35).

China: Fanjingshan, a very rare ecosystem
South Korea: the Sansa, mountain Buddhist monasteries
France: the Chaine des Puys Tectonic High Place – Limagne Fault
Indonesia: Heritage of the Ombilin coal mine in Sawahlunto
Australia: Budj Bim Cultural Landscape
Colombia: Chiribiquete National Park and “The Maloca of the Jaguars”
Czech Republic: Landscape of breeding and training of ceremonial carriage horses in Kladruby nad Labem
China: Archaeological ruins of the city of Liangzhu
Turkey: Göbekli Tepe and its mysterious temple
Laos: Xieng Khouang Megalithic Jar Sites – Plain of Jars
Burkina Faso: Ancient iron metallurgy sites
Denmark: Aasivissuit-Nipisat, Inuit hunting grounds
Azerbaijan: Historic Center of Sheki with the Khan’s Palace
Oman: the ancient city of Qalhat
India: City of Jaipur, Rajasthan
South Africa: the mountains of Barberton Makhonjwa
Bahrain: Tombs of the Dilmun culture
Canada: Writing-on-Stone / Áísínai’pi
Germany: the border archaeological complex of Hedeby and the Danevirke
Japan: Mozu-Furuichi Kofun Set: Ancient Japanese Burial Mounds
Spain: the caliphal city of Medina Azahara
Spain: Cultural Landscape of Risco Caido and the Sacred Mountains of Gran Canaria
Italy: The Prosecco Hills of Conegliano and Valdobbiadene
Iran: The Sasanian Archaeological Landscape of the Fars Region
Mexico: the Tehuacán-Cuicatlán Valley and its original habitat in Mesoamerica
The 20th Century Architectural Works of Frank Lloyd Wright
Iraq: Babylon
Myanmar: Bagan
United Kingdom: Jodrell Bank Observatory
Czech Republic: Mining region Erzgebirge/Krušnohoří
Poland: Prehistoric striped flint mining region of Krzemionki
Portugal: Sanctuary of Bom Jesus do Monte in Braga
Korea: Seowon, Korean Neo-Confucian Academies
Portugal: Mafra Royal Building – Palace, Basilica, Convent, Cerco Garden and Hunting Park (Tapada)
Russia: Churches of the Pskov School of Architecture
Iceland: Vatnajökull National Park – the dynamic nature of fire and ice
China: Migratory bird sanctuary along the coastline of the Yellow Sea and the Bohai Gulf
France: French Southern Lands and Seas
Brazil: Paraty and Ilha Grande – culture and biodiversity

THE END

Natural life

Farmer Robert Duncan was born in Utah, USA, and began painting at the age of 11.
I am happy to offer you this magnificent post, which allows us to discover an artist with a remarkable talent.
The thought will surely come to your mind that the paintings you will see seem to be photos.
Enjoy the realism of these images.
The End

All pictures by Robert Duncan, from the Internet.

And do yourself a favor and go find the artist: https://robertduncanstudios.com/

Thank you, Mr. Duncan!

Bordalo II

Artur Bordalo aka Bordalo II is an artist, born in Lisbon, who creates large installations from rubbish collected in the streets.

Born in Lisbon in 1987, Artur Bordalo signs as Bordalo II. Grandson of the painter Real Bordalo, he grew up watching his grandfather represent Lisbon. He attended the painting course at the Faculty of Fine Arts in Lisbon.
He uses rubbish to create large street installations, which depict animals or urban scenes. The garbage from abandoned factories, pieces in various types of plastic, and electronic waste are the materials he most likes to use in his compositions. Large pieces are welded to support, smaller pieces glued together, using a mixed technique.
With his works, he intends to draw attention to the problems of exaggerated consumerism and the waste resulting from it. They are the plastic translation of the phrase “One man’s trash is another man’s treasure”.
His art is three-dimensional, full of life, color, and movement.
If his first graffiti and installations were done clandestinely, today most of his works are carried out by invitation.
His works are scattered through the streets of Lisbon. Guaxinão is one of his most recent works (pictured above), included in the exhibition “Panic, Drama, Terror” that took place at the CCB, in Lisbon, in April.
Some works by Bordalo II.

M.I.
“Olhos de Mocho” (Owl Eyes)
“Guaxinim” (Racoon)
“Gato” (Cat)
“La Zebra Loka” (The Mad Zebra)
“LDN Rat”
“Weasel in Hamburg”
“Guarda-Rios” (Kingfischer)
“3D Green Lizard”
“Uma Cabra” (A Goat)
“Ouriço” (Hedgehog)
“Pig”
“Urso em Turim” (Bear in Turin)
“Coelho” (Rabbit)

“Olhos de Mocho” (Owl Eyes)
“Fox”
“Pelican”
“Flamingo”
“Camaleão” (Chameleon)
“Yellow Frog”
“Zpider”
“Portucock”
“Grifo” (Griffin)

All photos taken from the PowerPoint “Bordalo II” by M.I.

I’ve tried to find the name of all sculptures here, but some I just couldn’t…. If someone can help me with this, please sent a message!

All of you, go ding the one of a kind work of an exceptional Portuguese plastic artist!

Thank you, Bordalo II!

Some curious expressions

SOME CURIOUS EXPRESSIONS USED BY PORTUGUESE PEOPLE:

— A Portuguese doesn’t have a problem, in fact, he’s ‘feito ao bife’ (made to the steak).

— A Portuguese doesn’t tell you to leave him alone, he tells you ‘vai chatear o Camões’ (go and bother Camões).

— A Portuguese doesn’t tell you he’s sexy, he tells you ‘é boa como o milho’ (it’s good as corn).

— A Portuguese does not repeat what he says, he ‘vira o disco e toca o mesmo’ (turns the record and plays the same).

— A Portuguese is never bored, he just ‘fica com os azeites’ (stays with the olive oil).

— A Portuguese doesn’t have much experience, he has ‘muitos anos a virar frangos’ (many years turning chickens).

— A Portuguese doesn’t get out of trouble, he ‘sacode a água do capote’ (shakes the water out of his cloak).

— A Portuguese is not in a desperate situation, he has ‘água pela barba’ (water by the beard).

— A Portuguese doesn’t get angry, he ‘vai aos arames’ (goes to the wires).

— A Portuguese who changes his mind easily is an ‘troca-tintas’ (ink-changer).

— A Portuguese is not brazen, he ‘tem lata’ (has can).

— A Portuguese does not refuse to give information, he ‘fecha-se em copas’ (closes himself in hearts).

— A Portuguese doesn’t die, he ‘estica o pernil’ (stretches his ham).

— A Portuguese does not pretend to be deaf, he ‘faz orelhas moucas’ (makes his ears deaf).

— A Portuguese does not say that everything is suspended indefinitely, he says that ‘ficou tudo em águas de bacalhau’ (everything was left in codfish water).

— A Portuguese doesn’t say ‘It’s indifferent to me’, he says ‘Não me aquece nem me arrefece’ (Neither warms or colds me).

— A Portuguese person did not go through difficult situations, he ‘passou as passas do Algarve’ (passed the raisins of the Algarve).